Why are body repair panels black and what is EDP?

Is it black paint? Is it a primer? Can it be painted? Can you weld it? Is it rustproof?

Well, it’s none of these exactly but before we get into that let us first talk about what precisely EDP coatings are and why they are used on our body repair panels and other reproduction parts. EDP or Electrophoretically Deposited Paint coating is a process used by our manufacturers that helps ensure the longevity of our steel replacement parts and body panels during transportation, storage, and shipment to the end-user. EDP coatings add additional layers above the raw steel that helps prevent rusting and corrosion during the long overseas travel and until you install and paint these parts. The electric charge draws an even layer of EDP coating to all surfaces where it then bonds to create an even, protective coating. This even coating provides a layer of corrosion resistance after priming and painting giving your replacement parts a much longer life-span than the original panels. Almost all of our replacement body panels for Chevelle, Camaro, Nova, El Camino, and G-Body come coated with EDP. When you choose top quality reproduction panels from Ground Up SS396.com, you are getting high-quality EDP-coated panels and parts that save you time, money, and helps you make the most of your classic car investment.

What advantages do EDP Coatings provide? 

In the ’60s and ’70s, factory paint was applied directly to the steel body panels via spray guns, which for obvious reasons has its limitations. Tight spaces or areas covered by brackets would be missed and remain completely bare from any paint protection which resulted in those areas becoming increasingly prone to rust and corrosion over time. Today, with EDP coatings this is a thing of the past. The evenly distributed EDP coating covers every square inch of the stamped metal providing your restoration with a rust and corrosion-resistant surface even after priming and painting. 

How is an EPD Coating applied? 

After the raw steel has been stamped into your brand new reproduction body panel it’s ready to be coated in EDP to make for a long-lasting reproduction part. First, our manufactures prep the raw metal for this process by cleaning any contaminants from the surface of the metal caused by the stamping process. Next, the coating process itself takes place. Much like chrome plating, the reproduction body panel is submerged into a container which holds the coating bath and applies direct current electricity through the EDP bath using electrodes. This electric current is what ensures an even coating throughout the entire body panel. After the body panel is removed from the EDP bath it is rinsed to remove any additional EDP layers above the evenly applied surface. Lastly, the now evenly coated reproduction body panel is ready to be cured, packaged and loaded onto the shipping container. 

EDP Coating do’s and don’ts

Welding Body Panels and Parts: You should never weld directly to the EDP coating. We recommend that areas to be welded are sanded down to bare metal before making any welds. This will ensure the strongest bond between the 2 metals by eliminating all possible contaminants and impurities. 

Prepping EDP for paint: All that is required to paint your EDP Coated body panels and parts are sandpaper or a scruff pad. We recommend that you prep the surface of your reproduction panels for better primer/paint adherence by roughing up the surface of the EDP Coating. There is no need to completely remove the EDP coating as you could be sacrificing longevity in those hard to reach places. 

Painting EDP Coatings: EDP Coatings should never be the final finish on a reproduction panel. All automotive grade paint will work on EDP coated body panels and parts. Just be sure to follow the above mentioned prepping steps to ensure a quality finish. *Refer to manufactures paint guide for proper surface prepping*


Click here to Check Out Ground Up’s Exclusive Articles

MORE ARTICLES FROM GROUND UP SS396.COM